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Links a la Mode - this week`s 20 best blog posts voted by the Independent Fashion Bloggers

Sarah Burton - a close look at Alexander McQueen`s successor


    Back in May 2010, three months after Alexander McQueen's death, it was announced that Sarah Burton would take over as creative director.

    Sarah has a clear vision of what the brand should be like because she had been Alexander McQueen’s right hand for 16 years. And it was she who completed the last ever collection by the designer showcased at Paris Fashion Week in March.

    She understands the responsibility she has taken and wants to stay close to McQueen’s vision of fashion. She said:

    "The creation of modern, beautifully crafted clothes was at the heart of Lee’s vision. I intend to stay true to his legacy.”

    As she gears up to unveil her first womenswear collection for the Alexander McQueen label, Sarah Burton has revealed what to expect from her solo debut – and it’s not all angst and darkness.

    I don’t think it has to have as much angst in it. I think it will become softer,” she says. “There will always be this McQueen spirit and essence. But, of course, I’m a woman so maybe more from a woman’s point of view. There’s always got to be some darkness, because otherwise you don’t appreciate what’s light,” she explains. "I’ve had a training in darkness, but I don’t feel that it’s necessarily a personal thing to me. I’m a bit lighter.”



    And as for a typically theatrical show? “That was very much Lee’s territory – the spectacular show, in that way, I can’t try and pretend to be Lee. He was such a lovely man, and his mind never switched off. He was so important to me. You just wanted to make him happy, look after him,” she says. “Although I felt that I protected him, now I feel that he protected me.”



    Burton’s first "own" collection will be shown in Paris on October 5th.



    More facts on her:

    - She was born in Cheshire, England, and is one of five children.

    - Burton loved clothes early on: "I always drew dresses. I remember loving Richard Avedon's early Versace campaigns. I used to plaster my whole walls with them when I was a kid."

    - She attended Central Saint Martins in London and studied print design.

    - McQueen hired Burton straight out of school in 1997, and she began working on everything from menswear to accessories to footwear.

    - Burton considers herself a workaholic, but in her spare time, loves to attend art exhibitions.

    - Most recently, Burton has started doing needlepoint while watching TV.

    - She is married to photographer David Burton.

    - She has rooms full of Alexander McQueen pieces but dresses more casually in the office.

    - She plans on proving that a McQueen piece, though theatrical, can also be wearable: "What saddens me in a way is that Lee had these incredible shows, but always under that there were amazing pieces you could wear, but somehow nobody ever believed it was wearable."



    Sources: 1 2 3



    Hm...isn`t it sacrilege to aspire to make McQueen "more wearable"? Wasn`t the big show part of the concept? Wasn`t it the show that made McQueen more ART than fashion (which is what made him the legend that he is!)? Seriously, if I want something "wearable" I`ll consult Gucci or YSL. There is more than enough "wearable fashion" out there (and most of it looks like it shouldn`t be worn by anyone).



    McQueen was never only "all about darkness and angst". Just think of his successful Atlantis collection or his feather dresses!



    I`m a bit disapointed that it all sounds so low-key. Of course, nobody can ever truly continue McQueen`s unique vision (or it would take a soul as tormented as his...) but what she says doesn`t sound as if she really wanted to carry on his legacy.



    What do you think?

Burberry Prorsum S/S 11 summer collection

Burberry S/S 11 show coverage: fashion, celebs & models

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    Invitation to Burberry`s spring/summer 2011 show at Chelsea College London, september 21st 2010.



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    My outfit



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    The venue



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    Alexa Chung wearing Burberry

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    Sarah Jessica Parker wearing Burberry + Alexander McQueen bag



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    Poppy Delevigne wearing Burberry



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    Donna Air wearing Burberry



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    Mario Testino, who was the most charismatic & cool of all.

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    Anna and Ellie Wintour

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    Look! It`s your favourite blogger! :) (in front: the band The Cheek)



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    Stylish women at the event



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    Inside the venue - before the show



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    The seats of Jacquetta Wheeler and Erin O`Connor



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    Front row



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    View from my seat in row 4



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    Show finale



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    My view - oh these MEN with their pink cell-phones! *grr*



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    Julia Restoin-Roitfeld and Jacquetta Wheeler after the show



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    Burberry model Thomas Penfound (in his own clothes) after the show



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    Burberry Retail Theatre: the show was shown live at 25 flagship stores worldwide, among them Bond Street / London, St. Germain / Paris, Berlin / Germany, Venice, Milan & Rome / Italy.

    It was also broadcasted live on Burberry.com.



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    Remember that you can still order the runway collection until september 28th from http://us.burberry.com/home/index.jsp, http://uk.burberry.com/,http://www.burberry.fr/, http://www.burberry.de, http://www.burberry.it/



    Who`s outfit do you like best? Where did you watch the show?



    Picture sources: My own photos, Burberry press service and Vogue.de

Cheap Monday F/W 2010

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    The Cheap Monday fall 2010 collection gives an apocalyptic impression but with a sense of hope for the future; holes are mended and scarring is used as decoration.

    Razorblade slashes are repaired on both denim and jersey, patches are used together

    with spray paint and coatings in rough detailing. A rawness and nomadicity referring to futurism and punk suggests a DIY aesthetic.

    The colours consists of a monochrome palette with influences from concrete, plaster

    bandage and asphalt with accents indigo, wine red and army green.

    The silhouette is diverse with a strong anti fit combined with a tighter look. A clean, graphic angle is used on the styling to point our heads to the future.



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